Ecologies of Existence – Art and Media beyond the Anthropocene

poster

ECOLOGIES OF EXISTENCE
06/30/2016 Symposium with the Archipelago Lab

The pla­ne­ta­ry si­tua­ti­on, as it may be, is per­cei­ved as one of cri­sis; eco­lo­gi­cal­ly, eco­no­mi­cal­ly, and men­tal­ly. Whi­le the im­pact and de­struc­tive force of en­vi­ron­men­tal chan­ge re­cei­ve new at­ten­ti­on in the dis­cour­se on the an­thro­po­ce­ne, cri­sis, on the other hand, be­co­mes the ju­s­ti­fi­ca­ti­on for ex­ten­ded me­cha­nisms of con­trol. We find our­sel­ves in a tight­ly wo­ven nar­ra­ti­ve of a net­wor­ked all en­com­pas­sing (hu­man) con­di­ti­on per­mea­ted by ope­ra­ti­ons ma­nage­ment of com­ple­xi­ties and their preemp­ti­ve har­n­es­sing of af­fect. Against a mere sur­ren­der in the face of the­se pa­ra­ly­zing pro­ces­ses, but also dis­mis­sing a form of ca­pi­ta­list sub­sump­ti­on of the eco­lo­gi­cal as a la­bel on ever­y­thing, we want to in­sist on the no­ti­on of eco­lo­gy as con­cept and prac­tice that re­fu­ses any form of uni­ver­sa­li­ty. Re­sis­ting this to­ta­li­ty of cri­sis and con­trol as well as ad­ap­ta­ti­on and (non)sustaina­bi­li­ty we won­der how eco­lo­gy as eco­so­phic pra­xis be­co­mes a con­struc­tivist and trans­ver­sal “re­la­tio­nal ge­ne­ra­ti­vi­ty” along he­te­ro­ge­neous mo­des of exis­tence and their eco­lo­gies.

Brin­ging to­ge­ther prot­ago­nists from me­dia eco­lo­gy, bio­lo­gi­cal eco­lo­gy, and eco-me­dia dis­cour­ses, we ask: What kinds of prac­tices and aes­t­he­tic stra­te­gies might pro­vi­de us with a trans­ver­sal eco­lo­gy? What does eco­lo­gi­cal exis­tence mean and how do eco­lo­gies of exis­tence evol­ve? In a world, in which both con­cepts like na­tu­re or en­vi­ron­ment are un­der con­stant re­vi­si­on, and ta­king care for our com­pa­gni­on spe­cies seems too com­pli­ca­ted and ex­haus­ting, we want to find out how art and me­dia tech­no­lo­gies might co-com­po­se more re­la­tio­nal mo­des of exis­tence and their eco­lo­gies.

Du­ring the three days of the sym­po­si­um we fo­cus on four di­men­si­ons in clo­se re­so­nan­ce with each other:

  1. How can we think the notion of ecology more “environmentally?” If we consider the interlacing between social, mental, and environmental ecology, the notions of the environment and the environmental require a reconsideration as the material ground of planetary existence.
  2. What is the impact of collecting, monitoring, and interpreting (curating) data in relation to ecological conditions? How can we overcome the bifurcation between interpretative knowledges and the actual processes of exploitation?
  3. How do modes of ecological practicing occur between different sets of knowledge and making? What are the conditions of emergence for such interstitial practices? What is the function of art and aesthetics for such ecological modes of practice?
  4. How can we generate ecological practices with and through different modes of existence, capable of accounting for relational states of co-emergence?

http://www.leuphana.de/en/research-centers/cdc/news/single-view/date/2016/07/01/ecologies-of-existence.html

 

 

Advertisements

In Secrets of Coral Spawning, Hope for Endangered Reefs

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/video/players/offsite/index.html?videoId=100000004478187

Harold Fisk 1944 history of Mississippi River ma

Harold Fisk 1944 Mississippi Map3

Harold Fisk 1944 history of Mississippi River map

Harold Fisk 1944 Mississippi Map2

Harold Fisk 1944 history of Mississippi River map

Harold Fisk 1944 Mississippi Map

Harold Fisk 1944 history of Mississippi River map

courtney mattison sculpts colossal ceramic coral reefs to reflect our changing seas

courtney-mattison-our-changing-seas-designboom-02“our changing seas III’, presented from june 18 – august 28, 2016 at the palo alto art center, explores the rapid deterioration of corals from colorful and diverse, to sickened and bleached as a result of human-caused climate change. while the piece celebrates the aspects of a healthy reef, mattison depicts white skeletons of bleached corals surrounding the vibrant pieces in a monumental swirl. ‘there is still time for corals to recover even from the point of bleaching if we act quickly to decrease the threats we impose,’ she says. ‘perhaps if my work can influence viewers to appreciate the fragile beauty of our endangered coral reef ecosystems, we will act more wholeheartedly to help them recover and even thrive.’

NYT op-ed: New Orleans’s New Flood Maps: An Outline for Disaster

 

01horowitz-blog427.jpg

http://nyti.ms/1TJdolA

 

“The new maps also do not adequately highlight the shifting reality wrought by climate change. It’s not just that a warming planet heralds bigger and more frequent storms. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Louisiana faces the highest rate of sea-level rise of any coastal region on the planet: As seas rise, Louisiana’s land is sinking, part of an ancient geologic process of subsidence accelerated by the levee system itself, which prevents mud from the Mississippi River from replenishing the land. Already, the Corps of Engineers has had to rebuild sections of the new levee system that had sunk six inches below their original height.

According to current projections, roughly 75 percent of New Orleans will be below sea level by 2050, up from 54 percent today….

We face a difficult choice. The National Flood Insurance Program can charge an unsubsidized, or “actuarial,” rate for coverage (as Congress decreed in 2012, though it later severely limited how rapidly those rates could rise); doing so would impose crippling costs on homeowners. Or it can continue to subsidize development in dangerous places. But these new maps represent an unwise compromise: blinding residents to their physical vulnerability, while also inviting them to financial ruin.”

Rebecca Solnit’s current interview with Krista Tippit on New Orleans, Climate Change, a highly nuanced sense of “hope” that embraces uncertainty, and how history is more like the weather than it’s like a checkers game

A Solnit interview released today, that continues and extends our RWII artist talks!

Soundcloud lets you add comments right in the player.  Your comment is keyed to a particular moment in the interview.  Other listeners can access and consider/reply to your comment …

 

On the Beach, Saturday, May 21

RauschenbergBeach May2016 Photo Chris Cozier (20) RauschenbergBeach May2016 Photo Chris Cozier (19) RauschenbergBeach May2016 Photo Chris Cozier (18) RauschenbergBeach May2016 Photo Chris Cozier (17) RauschenbergBeach May2016 Photo Chris Cozier (16) RauschenbergBeach May2016 Photo Chris Cozier (15) RauschenbergBeach May2016 Photo Chris Cozier (14) RauschenbergBeach May2016 Photo Chris Cozier (13) RauschenbergBeach May2016 Photo Chris Cozier (12) RauschenbergBeach May2016 Photo Chris Cozier (11) RauschenbergBeach May2016 Photo Chris Cozier (10) RauschenbergBeach May2016 Photo Chris Cozier (9) RauschenbergBeach May2016 Photo Chris Cozier (8) RauschenbergBeach May2016 Photo Chris Cozier (7) RauschenbergBeach May2016 Photo Chris Cozier (6) RauschenbergBeach May2016 Photo Chris Cozier (4) RauschenbergBeach May2016 Photo Chris Cozier (2) RauschenbergBeach May2016 Photo Chris Cozier (1) RauschenbergBeach May2016 Photo Chris Cozier (32)RauschenbergBeach May2016 Photo Chris Cozier (24) RauschenbergBeach May2016 Photo Chris Cozier (25) RauschenbergBeach May2016 Photo Chris Cozier (26) RauschenbergBeach May2016 Photo Chris Cozier (28) RauschenbergBeach May2016 Photo Chris Cozier (29) RauschenbergBeach May2016 Photo Chris Cozier (31) RauschenbergBeach May2016 Photo Chris Cozier (30)