Category Archives: Captiva/Sanibel

THE REPORT

The Rising Waters Confab Report / Visual Book is complete.  Click here for the document.

RisingWatersReport

Rising Waters Confab Report

TABLE OF CONTENTS 
2 Participants
3 Introducing the Rising Waters Confab | Buster Simpson
4 Captiva’s Outlook | Leonard Berry
5 In the Dry Morning | Gretel Ehrlich
Science
7 SCIENCE & FACT
8 How the Arctic Drives the Climate of the Temperate World | Gretel Ehrlich
11 What Happened 120,000 Years Ago Could Repeat | John Englander
12 Surging Seas | Climate Central
14 We Have Time to Adapt, but No Time to Waste | John Englander
16 Digging for Water | Glenn Weiss
Commons
18 COMMONS
18 Is it Fair? | Thomas Ruppert
19 How to Talk About the Climate | Florida Sea Grant College Program
21 Week Two | Jeremy Pickard
22 Climate Change Is Gradual | June Wilson
24 Commons at Ground Level | Anne Focke
27 Commons Reader | Anne Focke
28 Rising Waters Blog | Anne Focke
30 Who Should be Our Allies? | Orion Cruz
Agiprops
31 AGITPROPS
32 Agitprop at Rally | Buster Simpson and Edward Morris
33 Statues of Brave Heroes of Climate Change Skepticism | Lewis Hyde
34 Drowning Man Festival | Lewis Hyde with Others
36 5 Actions to Stop Rising Seas | Xavier Cortada
38 Captiva Island H.V.A.C. Wedge | Buster Simpson
39 Making Ice Bags to Refreeze the Glaciers | Xavier Cortada
40 Glenn Weiss, Jungle Seeds
41 Week Two | Jeremy Pickard
42 L’Arctique est Paris | All Confab Collaboration, Lead Authors Mel Chin and Gretel Ehrlich
Invention
48 INTERVENTIONS & ENGAGEMENTS
49 Mangroves | Xavier Cortada, Walter Hood, and Buster Simpson
51 Removing Exotics | Xavier Cortada
Raked Free Zone | Buster Simpson
52 Pine Island Sound Expedition
54 Underwater Affair and Palm Column | Walter Hood
56 Hurricane Remodel…Hire an Artist | Lewis Hyde
57 The Graceful Retreat | Buster Simpson
58 National Midden Mound-ument Preserves | Buster Simpson and Andrea Polli
60 Rising Gas | Andrea Polli
62 Islands and Global Forces – Cretaceous-Tertiary Boundary | Andrea Polli and Buster Simpson
64 Voxel Frog // Mangrove | Buster Simpson
66 Limestone | David Buckland
68 Charcoal Sketch 2 for Neptune (A Play About Water) | Jeremy Pickard
OpenStudio
70 OPEN STUDIO
72 SOS Life Float & Reliquary | Buster Simpson
74 Suggesting Palm Readings | Laura Sindell
76 Charley and Bob | Andrea Polli
78 Luxury Island and American River Archive | Edward Morris and Susannah Sayler
80 The Water Table | Jeremy Pickard
82 Pinhole Cameras | Laura Sindell
84 More Sugar, Dear? | Laura Sindell
86 Grounding Line – I’ve Seen the Water on the Wall | Lewis Hyde
87 The Manatees at Blue Springs | Lewis Hyde
88 Becoming Water | Gretel Ehrlich
89 Death and Poetry | Gretel Ehrlich
90 Fathom’s Portal | Buster Simpson
91 Stacked Chairs | June Wilson
92 Table to Deploy // The Arctic is Captiva | Buster Simpson

Removing exotic invasives originally planted to drain our wetlands

Australian Pine: Removed from North Captiva on May 13th, 2015

Australian Pine: Removed from North Captiva on May 13th, 2015

In times of rising seas, it might sound counter-intuitive to remove plants like Australian Pine or Melalucca.  These exotic invasive trees –which means they outcompete the native flora and replace it with a monoculture that does not support biodiversity– were intentionally planted a century ago to help dredgers drain swamps and wetlands across our state.

These trees can’t live in saltwater– so they won’t help with rising seas… .  The rising seas will kill them and everything else.  We need to work proactively to replace them with the native plants of our native coastal habitats.  These habitats need to thrive so that as seas rise they can hopefully (it depends how fast the seas rise) move upland and sustain our web of life.

Xavier Cortada, "Hanging Gardens: Australian Pine at Brickell Studio," 24 nails and exotic invasive tree saplings uprooted from Virginia Key on North wall of artist's Brickell Studio, 8 ft x 16 ft, 2010.

Xavier Cortada, “Hanging Gardens: Australian Pine at Brickell Studio,” 24 nails and exotic invasive tree saplings uprooted from Virginia Key on North wall of artist’s Brickell Studio, 8 ft x 16 ft, 2010.

A while ago, I created a project called “Hanging Gardens” to encourage participants to go out and remove these exotic invasive trees.  They would use them as commodity — for instance, we would make wall paper from the Australian pine cones (http://www.xaviercortada.com/?page=HG_Australian_Pine) and drapes from the Melalucca (http://www.xaviercortada.com/?page=HG_Melaleuca).

A week ago, I ripped an Australian Pine from a beach in Northern Captiva and hung it as a trophy in Rauschenberg’s studio.  I did so because I wanted to brag about my kill.

And encourage others to do the same.

Australian Pine Trophy at Rauschenberg's Studio

Australian Pine Trophy at Rauschenberg’s Studio

// To learn move about hanging gardens visit http://www.xaviercortada.com/?page=hanging_gardens or see Facebook page.

Hanging Gardens at Auburn (2010): Using exotic invasive plants from East-Central Alabama, Hanging Gardens was implemented as the final assignment in Professor Christopher McNulty's combined intermediate-level and advanced-level sculpture class at Auburn University.

Hanging Gardens at Auburn (2010): Using exotic invasive plants from East-Central Alabama, Hanging Gardens was implemented as the final assignment in Professor Christopher McNulty’s combined intermediate-level and advanced-level sculpture class at Auburn University.

HANGING GARDENS at AUBURN

Using exotic invasive plants from East-Central Alabama, Hanging Gardens is also being implemented as the final assignment in Professor Christopher McNulty’s combined intermediate-level and advanced-level sculpture class at Auburn University.

The album (https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.386254613422.168054.258114758422&type=3) contains in-process shots from late April 2010. Some students are far along. Others quite a bit behind. They seem to have focused on privet, wisteria, and kudzu. Final crits are on April 30 and May 3rd, 2010.


CLASS SYLLABUS:

http://www.xaviercortada.com/resource/resmgr/hanging_gardens/hanginggardens10-auburn.pdf

4. Hanging Garden

Problem: Eco-artists work with scientists to develop ways of engaging communities in bioremediation. The natural world is truly an interconnected one. Sometimes, rebuilding healthy ecosystems requires not just replacing the native species humans removed, but also eliminating the dangerous ones humans introduced. The Hanging Gardens project is a series of indoor eco-art sculptures and installations developed by Miami-based artist Xavier Cortada that address the problem of exotic invasive species destroying South Florida’s ecosystems.

Describing the project,

Cortada has written:

“For ‘Hanging Gardens,’ I propose to create vertical gardens… comprised not of species we want to grow, but of trees we want to kill. The installations would be a series of five “hanging” gardens, each created using plant matter (e.g.: cut branches, vines, bark, cones) from a different exotic invasive tree cut down and removed from the local environment… [I will] work with volunteers to remove exotic invasive species from the community and use the plant matter as the material/medium for the installation… Serving as public hanging gardens, the installations would enlist local residents in re-creating them at home. Making commodities out of plants and trees too costly for the state to remove, the eco-art project would encourage residents to seek, cut down and remove the vegetation themselves. Showcasing their work, these participants would then encourage their neighbors and friends to also “un-grow” plant species that threaten the their local ecosystem as vertical gardens in their homes. Indeed, through Hanging Gardens I want to encourage today’s city dwellers to go on a new kind of wilderness safari.”

For this assignment, you will each create a Hanging Garden sculpture using invasive species that have been introduced to the ecosystems of East-Central Alabama.

After reviewing Cortada’s project online, we will have a guest speaker from the Alabama Invasive Plant Council lecture to the class. You will then choose and research an invasive plant to use as the raw material for your sculpture. You will use the problem-solving process covered in the Introduction to Sculpture course to begin exploring this problem. We will discuss these ideas as a class before you begin developing prototypes of your sculptures.

Caution: Do not trespass on private property to obtain your wood. It is illegal to harvest wood from state parks. Wear blaze orange colors during hunting season. Beware of poison ivy. Do not fell large trees without professional assistance.

Possible Materials & Tools: You must again use wood to create a significant portion of your object, but all materials are at your disposal.
Objectives:

To consider how eco-art can engage with community to mitigate environmental damage and to
help rebuild local ecosystems

To consider the broader ecological context as a source for untraditional artistic materials.

To understand the theory and practice of cradle-to-cradle design

To use drawing to investigate forms, concepts and construction methods

To execute your sculpture with an appropriate level of craft.

Value: 40 points

Proposal due: Working drawings due

Critique:

http://www.xaviercortada.com/?page=Hanging_Gardens

Simpson’s Ladder Chair joins the Strangler Fig

In 2013, Buster Simpson wound stranger fig roots around a aluminum ladder chair.  In 2015, the chair is firmly in the grasp of the tree.

Buster Simpson, Captiva Island, Installed 2014

Buster Simpson, Captiva Island, Installed 2013, Photograph 2015

Buster Simpson, Captiva Island, Installed 2014

Buster Simpson, Captiva Island, Installed 2013, Photo 2015

Buster Simpson, Captiva Island, Installed 2014

Buster Simpson, Captiva Island, Installed 2013, Photo 2015

 

I Hit Water at about 48 inches

At 8:03, May 14, , 2015, Glenn Weiss struck water at the Rauschenberg Residency on Captiva Isfand.  The layers were as follows:  Top soil with organic matter and tree roots from gumbo limbo tree and strangler fig,   a mixed layer of sand and organic matter, pure fine beach sand, a root layer most likely from a dead slash pine 5 feet from the dig and the final layer of broken and intact sea shells with brown-yellow water.

Glenn Weiss hits water

Glenn Weiss hits water

Dig site at time of water strike.

Dig site at time of water strike.

Captiva Mound Builders / Hole Diggers – A Ying and Yang

The island’s ants and crabs demonstrate the mandatory ying and yang of island construction.  If a hole is dug, a mound must be made.

Although not seen in the pictures, the holes must be re-dug or cleared after the rain or tide. Permanent structures are defined as repeated re-makings.

20150513_064535 20150513_064544 20150513_070306 rrbeachcrabmounds (10) rrbeachcrabmounds (20) rrbeachholes (36)

A short sound composition made from recordings of the pool

Kristie and Charlie